Tag Archives: photography

Von River Valley, Eyre Mountains

[landscapephotograph description=”Von River Valley, Autumn” photoname=”Von River Valley” photo=”https://timmulholland.com/wordpress1/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Von-River-Valley-Pan-8b.jpg” photourl=”http://timmulholland.photoshelter.com/image/I0000U20kis5uIXA”][/landscapephotograph]

  

I’m a person who loves to read maps, especially finely detailed topographic maps. First, I like to discover places that are new and interesting to me, and hopefully interesting photograph. With the plethora of maps on the internet (Google Maps and Google Earth, to name a couple), it’s really interesting to start to see someplace and then dig deeper. When I’m performing my research on US locations, I then find that deeper level of detail by pulling up USGS topographic maps on the Libre Map Project. I suspect that there are other, similar resources in the US, but I’ve been using Libre Map Project for years, so it’s my “go to” resource. My GPS is also a really good resource when I’m in the field, but I love these computer sites when I’m doing my research before I get into the field because it’s so much easier to see things on the bigger computer screen.

  

  

Fortunately for me, there’s a similar resource in New Zealand – NZ Topo Maps. When we’re planning our trips and tours in New Zealand, I’ll check out Google Earth for a start, and then head to NZ Topo Maps for a different view. I just love to pour over a good topo map and discover nooks and crannies that I didn’t know exist before.  For example, that’s how I “discovered” The Branches and made the trip further up Skippers Canyon.

  

  

Over the past few months, we’d heard about a place called the Mavora Lakes and it has been on our radar as a place to visit, maybe hike, maybe camp. It’s only a couple of hours from Invercargill and it’s not a major tourist area like Milford Sound, Te Anau and Queenstown. It seemed like a nice place to get away for a day and to relax.

  

  

I then hit the maps and “discovered” that, yes, Mavora Lakes looks like an interesting place. But the road to Mavora Lakes keeps going further and further from civilization – that’s my kind of road to explore!!! In fact, the road to Mavora Lakes and beyond goes all the way to Lake Wakatipu, which is the lake on which Queenstown is situated. There are no towns or villages on the road beyond Mavora Lakes. The only signs of civilization in this area on the map are a couple of sheep stations at the end of the road on Lake Wakatipu. These two stations are remote. The nearest town, Mossburn, is about a two-hour drive from them, although it’s only a eighteen kilometers by boat to Queenstown.

  

  

When we went to Mavora Lakes, the weather didn’t seem like it might be the best. It’s late autumn here and there was a lot of fog as we started the drive. The fog eventually lifted and we made it to Mavora Lakes uneventfully. The lakes were nice and pleasant, and it did seem like it would be a good place to relax. Of course, the sandflies were there, too. There were even a few people camping and exploring the area like us, so this is likely a reasonably popular place to visit in Southland during tourist season. We were contemplating lunch (actually, the kids were more like demanding it) when I suggested that we drive further on the road. It looked like it might be “only” another hour until we reached Lake Wakatipu.

  

  

A few kilometers further north of Mavora Lakes is when the good scenery and clouds really kicked in! Asta and I were oohing and aahing all of the time. When we finally came over a rise and saw Lake Wakatipu, we both blurted out WOW! at the same time. I have to say that this drive is one of my top three drives in New Zealand. Driving from Te Anau to Milford Sound is likely my favorite drive, and Skippers Canyon is my second favorite. The autumn foliage and dark, majestic clouds really set off the Von River Valley and the Thomson and Eyre Mountain Ranges, as well as Lake Wakatipu. At the end of the road, there wasn’t much to see in terms of civilization, but the views were spectacular! We stopped and enjoyed our lunch surrounded by a few hundred sheep who were hoping that we might want to share with them.

  

  

At the end of the road, there are two sheep stations, plus a resort.  One of the sheep stations, Mount Nicholas Station, also doubles as a nice, small, remote getaway place. The resort is the Colonel’s Homestead and is operated a resort by RealJourneys, which is a major tourist operator in southern New Zealand. We didn’t get close to the Colonel’s Homestead and just enjoyed our lunch views of Lake Wakatipu.

  

  

On the way back, the skies looked a little dark and blustery. These dark clouds made for excellent photographs and also for a bit of angst – would it start raining and make it difficult to ford the streams before we got past the last ford? Obviously, we made it, again with lots of oohs and aahs.

   
 
Again, enjoy the gallery – especially full screen:

  

   

  

46 S EnZed signing off…

 

   

 

Posted in Colonel's Homestead, Eyre Mountains, Lake Wakatipu, Mavora Lakes, Mount Nicholas, New Zealand, Queenstown, Thomson Mountains, Von River, Walter Peak Station Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Moeraki Boulders

[landscapephotograph description=”Moeraki Boulders, New Zealand” photoname=”Moeraki Boulders” photo=”https://timmulholland.com/wordpress1/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/MoerakiBoulders-6c.jpg” photourl=”http://timmulholland.photoshelter.com/image/I0000PavdToOpgxg”][/landscapephotograph]

 

 

It’s hard to believe that it’s been nearly a month since my last post.  Time flies when you’re having fun in Australia.

 

 

On the big trip around New Zealand in January, one of our first significant stops were the famous Moeraki Boulders, a few kilometers north of Dunedin on the South Island’s east coast. The Moeraki Boulders aren’t exactly spectacular like a lot of New Zealand’s mountain scenery, but they’re still awe-inspiring in their own way. These boulders (and other similar boulders around the world) are concretions that were formed when minerals (calcite) seeped into the interstitial spaces between mud and sand grains and “hardened.” Don’t ask me exactly why these minerals hardened; similarly, don’t ask me why these concretions are so nicely spherical in shape. Just chalk it up to some of the wonderful geological mysteries of Nature.  (Yes, I know that I’m a guy and that I’m supposed to know everything, but let’s just leave it at that.) I’m not going to write a whole lot this time and just leave you to enjoy the gallery at your own pace.

 

46 S EnZed signing off…

Posted in Dunedin, Moeraki Boulders, New Zealand Also tagged , , , , , , , , |

Secret Falls

[landscapephotograph description=”Secret Falls, near Leland, Wisconsin” photoname=”Secret Falls” photo=”https://timmulholland.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/SecretFalls-3585.jpg” photourl=”http://timmulholland.photoshelter.com/image/I0000VpKJ6xxiW60″][/landscapephotograph]

 

I’m home…

 

Actually, no, we’re still in New Zealand (just got back from a beautiful weekend in Wellington), but I have some photographs from “home” that I want to share. Wisconsin has quite a few beautiful locations (though, not quite as many as New Zealand).

 

There’s this one special place that I know that’s literally “buried” in the Baraboo Hills and I found it in the strangest way – literally (sonically? aurally?), by keeping my ears open. I photographed a wedding in Sauk Prairie in the spring of 2008. The reception was at the Lake Wisconsin Country Club. It had been a good day, but when the wedding party settled into their suppers, it was nice to take a break. I was sitting at the bar, likely enjoying a gratis soda, when two guests sidled up to the bar, ordered Oddbins Vodka drinks and started talking. A couple of guys… I wasn’t trying to pay any attention to them – really! But, I could make out some of their words:  waterfall, wisconsin society of ornithology, and I don’t remember what else. I tucked those few words away and spent the rest of the evening enjoying and recording the festivities (especially when the wedding party borrowed some golf carts and we went around the course and took some memorable photographs!).

 

After I edited the portraits and presented them to the couple, I started to perform my research on this mystery waterfall that may or may not exist. The bad news is that there wasn’t a whole lot to go on. The good news is that my skills and resources did provide me some good starting points. I contacted a good friend who is a major bird lover – and significant on the state and national level with the National Audobon Society. He provided me some good leads, but didn’t know the land for which I was searching. He did suggest that I do some additional research on the Wisconsin Society of Ornithology, which I did. I contacted a friend at the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and he did know about the waterfall that I was seeking. In fact, he’d been there! But, he wouldn’t tell me because the waterfall resided on non-DNR lands and he didn’t want to let the cat out of the bag. The good news is that he did provide me some basic information and let me know that I was on the right track – the Honey Creek State Natural Area.

 

So, between weddings and other work, I took some time to do some exploring on at the Honey Creek State Natural Area (SNA), which is just a few miles northwest of Leland, Sauk County, Wisconsin (fyi – Natural Bridge State Park is just a few miles northeast of Leland and Hemlock Draw SNA is just north of town). I took four separate trips to Honey Creek. The first three trips I walked all over the property and found a lot of interesting land, streams, plants, and so on – but no waterfall. Along Honey Creek, there are some beautiful sandstone walls that have been carved out by the Creek. After walking all over the Honey Creek SNA and coming home covered with mud, sweat and scratches, I decided that it was time to get a little smarter.

 

Based on the information that I had, I also knew that The Nature Conservancy had interest in the Honey Creek property so I made a little research trip down to the Wisconsin Chapter of The Nature Conservancy. I explained to a staff member what I was seeking at Honey Creek and he showed me a map of the area that noted The Nature Conservancy’s property. Lo and behold, it turns out that The Nature Conservancy owned a little piece of land just north of the Honey Creek SNA.Voila! That was the good news. The bad news is that The Nature Conservancy’s property wasn’t contiguous with the Wisconsin Society of Ornithology property, but maybe a thousand feet north.

 

A few days later, I made another trip to Honey Creek and went further and deeper than I’d ventured before. Now, it was getting later in the spring/early summer and the weather was getting warmer and more humid. And, the mosquitoes were starting to come out! I hiked through the weeds along the stream bank and slogged up stream as far as I’d been before and then went further. There was a reasonably clear property line on the north end of the Honey Creek SNA. Having worked for the Wisconsin DNR for many years, I have some knowledge about the rules regarding property, trespassing, and who owns what, etc. The State of Wisconsin owns all of the water in the State, up to the common high water mark (or something like that). That meant that I could walk in Honey Creek and not trespass on the private property owner’s land, and continue my watery hike north to the other sliver of Nature Conservancy land. Eventually, I came to a small side stream that had a pretty good flow, and some really attractive pink quartzite in its bed. (Yes, I do get excited by some odd things in the beds that I visit!)

 

Another few hundred feet up the side stream and there it was – the most beautiful waterfall that I’ve ever seen in Wisconsin!!! It was very satisfying and inspiring to have spent these past few weeks searching, busting my butt, coming out of the woods wet and stinking, and then to be sitting there in front of it.  I can’t remember how long I spent there, enjoying it, soaking it up, and photographing it. It was relatively small and intimate, but surrounded by beautiful green foliage, and the pink quartzite really set it all off.  In some ways, this was quite the highlight of my summer.  And, to make for a great autumn, I went to “Secret Falls” in the late September, just as the trees were turning a bit, and as the mosquitoes were migrating south.

 

And, that’s the last time that I visited Secret Falls until last May. As Memorial Day was approaching, we were thinking of things to do in the area, and heading back to Secret Falls had been on my “to do” list for quite some time. The family was game for a decent hike, and we dragged along a great friend who also loves to hike. Unfortunately, I didn’t do a satisfactory job of adequately describing the hike and conditions to everyone. While I wore long pants and shirt, I forgot to suggest to everyone else that they might want to do likewise. When I hiked to Secret Falls, it usually took me about 90 minutes to get there from my parked car. But, my crew was slower, the weather was quite hot and humid, and they didn’t appreciate all of the stinging nettles along the way. To avoid the nettles and tall weeds, they all hiked in the stream bed for a good portion of the hike. If you haven’t hiked in a stream bed before, it’s not very easy – you’re sloshing through the water, you can’t see your footing very well, there are rocks and cobbles all over the stream bed and they make your feet and ankles hurt. Also remember that some of my victim’s legs were much shorter than mine, so there was another aspect of the death march that wasn’t appreciated. After about three hours of hiking and whining, we finally made it to Secret Falls! My family and friend did appreciate Secret Falls as being a very beautiful waterfall, but they also felt that the price of admission was higher than I had lead them to believe. Below is a small gallery of photographs from this last trip to Secret Falls. After the seemingly never ending hike, I had to rescue my victims by taking them to the nearest lunch stop, which happened to be at a bar in Leland.

 

My family is now much more wary when I suggest a hike…  🙂

 

 

 

 

And, here’s a gallery from my 2008 trips:

 

As an expression of my appreciation to The Nature Conservancy for all that they do, and particularly at Honey Creek, I donated a very large canvas print of Secret Falls to their Madison office.

 

Finally, if you’re also a glutton for punishment, here’s a map and GPS coordinates that will help you to find Secret Falls – but don’t blame me if you come back hot, sweaty, sore and happy!

 

Modified DNR map showing TNC land in red to the north of the Honey Creek SNA.

Modified DNR map showing TNC land in red to the north of the Honey Creek SNA.

46 S EnZed signing off…

 

 

Posted in Secret Falls, Uncategorized, Wisconsin Also tagged , , , , , , , |

Purakaunui Bay

In late January, I was able to dash over to The Catlins for part of a day to a place that I hadn’t yet visited – Purakaunui Bay, which is just downstream from Purakaunui Falls. I love to look at topographical maps, Google Earth and any resource like that where I can get a bit of a view of the land and a sense as to whether it might be photogenic. And, in this case, while we were visiting Curio Bay once, I asked a Department of Conservation warden where her favorite places to visit could be found, something that might be a bit off the beaten track, and she mentioned Purakaunui Bay.

The weather in Invercargill was wonderful that day – blue skies, warm and a bit of a breeze blowing in from the Southern Ocean. Driving to Purakaunui Bay is only about 75 minutes on the main road, but then another fifteen minutes or so down some gravel roads. The closer that I got to the coastline, the more low-lying clouds and fog that I could see hanging over the sea. I was beginning to think that maybe my trip was for nought…

Oh, but I was so wrong!!! Yes, I didn’t get the spectacular landscape vistas of which I’d been dreaming, but I did find a very interesting, eerie, ethereal setting – and it was wonderful and inspiring! The cliffs, waves and beach were coming into and going out of view depending upon the thickness of the fog. The creative side of my mind recognized the non-landscape, non-nature possibilities of this setting and I was not disappointed.

In the following gallery, yes, you’ll certainly see nature and landscape photographs. But, I also felt the “tug” to go a bit more “zen” on these photographs and I’m quite pleased with most of the results. Enjoy and if there’s one that particularly speaks to you, stop the slideshow and just breathe it in…

46 S. EnZed signing off….

Posted in Catlins, Invercargill, New Zealand, Purakaunui Bay, zen Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Catlins II

This is a long overdue post about our second trip to The Catlins, which was seems like ages ago now, with all that we’ve been through and done.  In reality, though, it was “only” two and half months ago – my how time flies when you’re having fun!

 

 

This trip to The Catlins was just a day trip and again in typical New Zealand weather – some sun, some clouds, some rain, some wind.  Our first stop was a pleasant little waterfall called Purakaunui Falls.  The hardest part was driving on the various backroads to get to it; it was only a short walk from the car park.  Again, another pleasant gem of a waterfall in New Zealand!  All of the rain here does provide some benefits!

 

 

A little further down the road, we made our way over to Jacks Bay, Jacks Blowhole and Penguin Bay.  Now, if you’ve had the dark pleasure of watching the recent/new movie Two Little Boys, then you’ll recognize Jacks Blowhole.  And, if you haven’t seen the movie and you’d like to see a different side of southern New Zealand and Invercargill that I can’t (and won’t) show you, then I’d encourage you to get out and see it if you have the opportunity.  (Or, just try to download it from Netflix or iTunes.)

And, finally, I tried to do some “artsy” photography while at Jacks Bay, enjoying the sand and water drainage patterns (and, a sheep’s mandible in the sand).

 

Enjoy,

46 EnZed South signing off…

 

 

 

Posted in Catlins, New Zealand Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Milford from the air

If you’ll recall our sagas here in New Zealand, you’ll recall that we were stranded in Milford Sound for a few days – that blog piece is here.

 

 

You might also recall that Asta needed to fly out of Milford Sound so that she could return to work, whilst Aras, Julija and I stayed around Milford Sound and got to know it better than we had ever expected.

 

On Asta’s flight out of Milford Sound, she managed to take some nice photos from the air that will provide you with a different perspective on New Zealand’s Southern Alps.  They’re even more spectacular from the air!!!

 

Enjoy!

46 S EnZed signing off…

 

Posted in Milford Also tagged , , , , , , , |

Holiday Photo Gallery

At the request of my better half, I’m posting some fun photos that she chose from some of our travels over the past couple of weeks.  You’ll note that there are no rockslide photos in this gallery!

 

And, please remember to view full screen!

 

Enjoy,

 

46 S EnZed signing off…

Posted in New Zealand Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Wanaka Weekend

Yes, today’s entry will be more of a travelogue and I’ll get back to some beautiful pictures in the near future.

 

 

This past weekend, we drove to Arrowtown, Cromwell, Wanaka and home. The weather wasn’t all that pleasant, especially during Friday’s driving, but it slowly improved.

 

 

Panoramic View of Lake Wakatipu, New Zealand (“click” for a larger view)

Arrowtown is a small, historic mining town a few kilometers northeast of Queenstown (and, Queenstown is about two hours north of Invercargill, in the mountains). Arrowtown is definitely some place that we want to return, particularly in the austral autumn. We ate at a fun place (Mondo’s Café) that we’d love to visit again. The main area of town is small and quaint, and the area is surrounded by the Crown Range on the northeast.

 

Panoramic View from Cardrona in the Crown & Criffel Ranges, with the Cardrona River Valley (“click” for a larger view)

 

On Saturday, we drove over to Cromwell and ate breakfast in a coffee shop. Cromwell seems to be a fruit and vegetable growing region, particularly for fruit trees such as apples, pears and the like. Our weather was a bit overcast, but Cromwell is a pleasant town that I hope we’ll visit again when the weather is more pleasant. Cromwell sits on the shores of Lake Dunstan and it must be spectacular to look over this valley from some altitude! After breakfast, we drove up the Clutha River Valley and the beautiful views across the Valley to the Dunstan Range, with the Pisa Range on our left. There were many orchards as we entered and left Cromwell, and the further that we drove from Cromwell, the more sheep that we saw. Did we mention that it’s lambing season here?

 

 

Since the weather was less than wonderful on Saturday, we visited Puzzling World just east of Wanaka. I have to say that I’m not the kind of person who appreciates the normal touristy things (a.k.a., “tourist traps”) that other people enjoy, particularly in places like the Wisconsin Dells, but I did enjoy Puzzling World. First, there was a large maze that we visited. We spent at least an hour “lost” within it, and enjoyed ourselves. I’m also happy to write that I’m the only mouse who earned the cheese! Asta, Aras and Julija bailed out via an emergency exit, while I suffered through ‘til the end! Inside of Puzzling World there was a variety of visual and physical puzzles – oddly tilted rooms, the Ames Room, holograms, and art by some of my favorite artists like M.C. Escher, Rob Gonsalves and Patrick Hughes (I really like Hughes’ work! It’s inspired me since I first saw a couple of his pieces in San Francisco several years ago).

 

 

Crown Terrace Panorama, overlooking the Arrow River, The Remarkables, Frankton and Queentstown (“click” for a larger view)

After Puzzling World, we finally made it to Wanaka and it’s one of the most beautiful towns I’ve ever visited! (I think that I said the same thing about Queenstown.) Another beautiful town located along a lake (Lake Wanaka) and surrounded by mountains. One of the many highlights of the weekend (at least for me) was finally being able to watch the New Zealand national rugby team, The All Blacks, play. The All Blacks are to New Zealand what da Packers are to Wisconsin, so you get the point. I hardly understand rugby – all of it’s nuances, etc. – but my favorite part is the haka. This next link is to the haka from the September 15th, 2012 match against South Africa, which the All Blacks won (I smile every time I watch that video!). (As a side note, I do believe that the Green Bay Packers could benefit from their own haka; it’s pretty easy to imagine Clay Matthews taking the lead!) The Wanaka area and Mt. Aspiring National Park will be a wonderful area to visit (many times?) this coming summer.

 

 

Finally, on Sunday, we ventured to the Cardrona Ski Area that’s about an hour away from Wanaka. I enjoyed Cardrona much more than The Remarkables – I even skied this time! The weather was warm, the sun was shining and clouds were blowing through from time to time. I was feeling pretty good until Julija started skiing circles around me! The drive from Cardrona to Queenstown was absolutely gorgeous, via the Crown Range Road. We’re looking forward to taking this drive again during the summer months.

OK, that’s all for now. It’s time to get back to reality – picking up the kids from school and planning our next trip around beautiful New Zealand.

 

 

46 S EnZed signing off…

Posted in Wanaka Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Blog restart, 1 July 2012, after taking Oxycodone.

This is the “start” of my blog page – again.  I’m restarting it to share with you our adventures in New Zealand during 2012/2013, and whatever else comes my way

The reason I had to stop blogging a while ago was because my mom got a major surgery and ended with her in a lot of pain. The doctors gave her all sorts of painkillers that didn’t help. Then, a nurse came and told us about oxycodone. I went online and learn that you can buy oxycodone without prescription because they have their own certified doctors. So, if you are on pain, anything from a minor headache up to nerve pain, just click on the link for more information.

 

 

 

Enjoy,

Tim!

Posted in New Zealand, Uncategorized Also tagged , , |