Notice: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/content/p3pnexwpnas10_data01/24/2789724/html/wp-content/themes/photocrati-pro/functions/photocrati-fonts.php on line 42

Notice: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/content/p3pnexwpnas10_data01/24/2789724/html/wp-content/themes/photocrati-pro/functions/photocrati-fonts.php on line 42

Notice: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/content/p3pnexwpnas10_data01/24/2789724/html/wp-content/themes/photocrati-pro/functions/photocrati-fonts.php on line 42

Notice: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/content/p3pnexwpnas10_data01/24/2789724/html/wp-content/themes/photocrati-pro/functions/photocrati-fonts.php on line 42

Notice: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/content/p3pnexwpnas10_data01/24/2789724/html/wp-content/themes/photocrati-pro/functions/photocrati-fonts.php on line 42

Notice: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/content/p3pnexwpnas10_data01/24/2789724/html/wp-content/themes/photocrati-pro/functions/photocrati-fonts.php on line 42

Notice: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/content/p3pnexwpnas10_data01/24/2789724/html/wp-content/themes/photocrati-pro/functions/photocrati-fonts.php on line 42

Notice: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/content/p3pnexwpnas10_data01/24/2789724/html/wp-content/themes/photocrati-pro/functions/photocrati-fonts.php on line 42

Notice: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/content/p3pnexwpnas10_data01/24/2789724/html/wp-content/themes/photocrati-pro/functions/photocrati-fonts.php on line 42

Notice: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/content/p3pnexwpnas10_data01/24/2789724/html/wp-content/themes/photocrati-pro/functions/photocrati-fonts.php on line 42

Notice: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/content/p3pnexwpnas10_data01/24/2789724/html/wp-content/themes/photocrati-pro/functions/photocrati-fonts.php on line 42

Notice: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/content/p3pnexwpnas10_data01/24/2789724/html/wp-content/themes/photocrati-pro/functions/photocrati-fonts.php on line 42

Notice: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/content/p3pnexwpnas10_data01/24/2789724/html/wp-content/themes/photocrati-pro/functions/photocrati-fonts.php on line 42

Notice: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/content/p3pnexwpnas10_data01/24/2789724/html/wp-content/themes/photocrati-pro/functions/photocrati-fonts.php on line 42
Tim Mulholland's Illuminata Photo | lighthouse

Tag Archives: lighthouse

Door County Flight

[landscapephotograph description=”Cave Point” photoname=”Cave Point” photo=”http://timmulholland.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Door-County-0620-copy.jpg” photourl=”http://IlluminataPhoto.zenfolio.com/p188788678/e7cee0a8c”][/landscapephotograph]

 

 

I don’t intend to write a lot in this piece, as a picture is worth a thousand words.  As I’ve been “spreading my wings” these past few weeks, I’ve been taking longer and longer flights – weather permitting. One of the places over to which I’ve wanted to fly is Door County, Wisconsin. Door County is a very scenic place from the ground, but it’s even more spectacular from the air.

Without further adieu, here’s a link to the photo slide show that I’ve created, followed by a video tour. During the video capture, my GoPro decided to turn itself off while I was approaching one of my favorite locations in Door County – Cave Point County Park – so there’s a “hole” in the video that I really wanted to create. And, the battery in the GoPro was exhausted just after leaving the “tip” of Door County. Also, in various portions of the video, I’ve “sped up” the video to move through it all faster – and so the flight looks a bit rougher than in reality.

Enjoy!

N914VX, signing off!

 

 

Posted in Door County, Flying Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Catlins III

So, this post is mostly a few photographs from a day trip earlier this month to The Catlins.  Asta had to work on the weekend, so Aras, Julija and I ventured eastward for the day to discover a couple of more places on our “to-do” list.  There’s a photo gallery at the bottom of this page.

 

 

The first place we stopped was Slope Point.  There’s nothing particularly remarkable about Slope Point – it looks pretty much the same as the rest of the southern coast – rocky, wet, waves, gulls, etc.  One noticeable difference is that it was a gorgeous, sunny day!  What Slope Point is known for is being the southern-most point in “mainland” New Zealand.  Stewart Island is definitely further south, but Slope Point is the furthest point on the South Island.  We (i.e., “I”) were hoping to walk across a farmer’s sheep paddock to get all the way to the coast, except it’s “lambing season” now, which means that some of the tramps across farmland are off limits during September and October, while the ewes are birthing their lambs during the austral spring.

 

 

Our second major stop was Nugget Point.  It’s a pretty place on the SE coast of the South Island.  There’s a nice lighthouse at the end of Nugget Point, and a very pleasant walk to get there. Nugget Point is named this way because of the “nuggets” (small islands) that sit just offshore of the point.   One of the other great things about Nugget Point is that this was our first place to see New Zealand fur seals!  There also is a yellow-eyed penguin rookery on Nugget Point, but we were there just a bit too early in the season and day to see the penguins.  We’re hoping to see more penguins on our next trips when we get to the coast.

 

 

Today, Sunday, September 30th, we’re “celebrating” Julija’s kiwi pox (a.k.a., chicken pox, varicella).  Julija came to me as we were getting ready for bed on Thursday night and asked what the spots were on her belly and hip.  (Aras & Julija are now between their third and fourth school terms – sort of a two-week spring break.)  This was after I had spent much of the day planning part of our first big trip around the South Island – Invercargill to Dunedin to Oamaru to Christchurch to Kaikoura and more.  I’d booked a couple of hotels and a whale-watching tour.  Oh well.  The good news is that I’ve been able to find a sweet deal on a campervan rental, so we’ll not contaminate hotels and tourists on the whale-watching tour.  But, we’ll still get out and do some hiking, sight-seeing, etc.

Posted in Catlins Also tagged , , , , , , , , |

Catlins I

Finally, and with much anticipation from my wife, I’m very pleased to post the first photographs of our travels here in New Zealand!

 

 

We had been in Invercargill all of 36 hours and Asta had us on the road and exploring.  Since we’re in winter weather here, the mountains can be a little iffy, so we’ve spent most of our traveling time on the southeast coast of the South Island of New Zealand.

 

 

To the east of Invercargill is an area called “The Catlins.”   This region reminds me some of the Baraboo Hills, as well as the Appalachian Mountains – hilly, rugged, green, pleasant.  The area is covered with either sheep farms or impenetrable temperate rainforest rather than farms and mixed hardwood forests we’d see in the States.   The roads are narrower and slower driving than similar roads in the States, particularly if you’re jet-lagged.   And, another major difference is that to the south there’s the Pacific Ocean.

 

 

On our first trip outside of Invercargill, we drove east and visited three main areas.  The first place that we stopped was Waipapa Point, which is the location of a nice lighthouse and maybe some seals/sea lions, if it’s the right time of year (which it wasn’t).  Yes, leaving the heat of Madison and a few days later being in the windy bluster off the sea at Waipapa Point was a bit of change of scenery.  I think that the wind quickly blew off our summer tans.

 

 

 

 

A few kilometers east of Waipapa Point we stopped at Curio Bay.  Rather than use my words, I’ll rely on someone else’s words via Wikipedia:

 

Curio Bay features the petrified remains of a forest 160 million years old. This represents a remnant of the subtropical woodland that once covered the region, only to become submerged by the sea. The fossilised remnants of trees closely related to modern kauri and Norfolk pine can be seen here.”

 

Fortunately, we were at Curio Bay at low tide and were able to see the fossilized trees.  Around the corner from the fossilized trees, we found a narrow, tantalizing cove where the waves would rush in and spread over the rocks.  I enjoyed that more, just watching the waves wash over everything.

 

 

Finally, as our jet-lagged bodies were screaming to stop driving and go back to bed in the middle of the afternoon, we made our longest hike, all of 20 minutes, to McLean Falls.   The hike was pleasant and easy, if a bit damp and wet in the misty rain.  And, it was our first foray into the rainforest!  It was such a contrast from being in a typical North American forest – ferns are growing everywhere, everything is damp and green, thick, lush – and, I really didn’t have the desire to try to walk off the “track” (trail) since it looked like it would involve too much work bushwhacking.   We first spotted a waterfall and thought that it was nice.  We then found that the trail continued, so we followed it upward and found the very impressive McLean Falls!

 

 

And, just to whet your Kiwi weather appetite, we’re now into spring weather.  This seems to mean that you have one day of nice weather, intermingled with a couple three days of cool, rainy weather.  The rainy days are very different from a Midwestern rainy day.   The weather can literally change almost 180 degrees within an hour.  There have been many times the past week when the wind will be howling like a banshee, the skies dark and grey, and then the clouds break and the sun comes out.  I’ve never been in such fierce winds as here for such an extended period of time.  We’re also having several minutes of blustery rain, sleet and pebble hail, followed by a period of broken clouds and sun.

 

You have to be prepared for most any type of weather or, as we see many folks here do, just say “what weather?”   I’m amazed at how people here dress.  Yes, you’ll see quite a few people in their warmest winter coats, hats, gloves and scarves.  And, right behind them, you’ll see someone in shorts, a warm shirt and hat.  It seems to me that these southern Kiwis are much tougher than me when it comes to the weather – but I’m adjusting.

 

We hope that you’re enjoying these tidbits as much as we’re enjoying sharing them with you.  And, we certainly appreciate having the opportunities that we have to explore New Zealand!

 

46 S EnZed signing off…

Posted in Catlins Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Notice: Undefined variable: custom_footer_markup in /home/content/p3pnexwpnas10_data01/24/2789724/html/wp-content/themes/photocrati-pro/footer.php on line 107