Tag Archives: hike

John Muir Trail

 

Aras overlooking Garnet Lake.

 

John Muir Trail

 

Ice & Fire: a wee wander on the John Muir Trail in two acts

 

 

I don’t recall the impetus for wanting to backpack the John Muir Trail (JMT). I’m guessing that it had to do with my love of the outdoors, going on an occasional backpacking trip, and naming my first son Muir. I do recall that my interest started to climb a couple of years ago as I realized that my younger son, Aras, might favorably mature by taking such a trip, as well as realizing that I wasn’t getting any younger.

 

Shortly after I started to ponder such a trip and the various logistics, I realized that my nephew, Vladas, might enjoy the trip. I mentioned this idea to my sister-in-law while we were traveling in Alaska and she thought that it was a good idea to consider. Shortly thereafter, Vladas was on board.

 

A few weeks later in September 2016, I mentioned to that first son, Muir, that I was looking to take Aras and Vladas on the JMT in the summer of 2017. Ten minutes later, Muir surprised me and said that he wanted to go, along with his (then) girlfriend. So, the logistics quickly magnified!

 

The fall and winter of 2016/2017 were spent studying and planning. Permits for five were obtained from Yosemite National Park in January, 2017 for a southbound adventure. The winter of 2016/2017 was one of the snowiest on record in the Sierra Nevada mountains and I was always monitoring the Sierra snowpack. We made a “go” decision in late spring 2017, knowing that snow would be an issue. The combination of everyone’s schedules allowed us a window from late June to the end of July. The permit that we received in the lottery was for a 25 June 2017 start, which seemed early given the historic Sierra snows (200% of average). But, we were unable to obtain a permit in the lottery for any later.

 

There was a lot of food dehydrating and vacuum sealing occurring during Spring 2017, as well as picking up additional gear from REI and eBay. The overwhelming snowfall the winter before meant that our hoped for first resupply at Tuolumne Meadows wouldn’t be available; we needed to make it to Reds Meadow to resupply. Buckets of food were shipped in June 2017.

 

 

ACT I:

 

We all flew to Fresno and the next day missed our bus to Yosemite Valley. Quick-thinking Muir found us an Uber to the Valley that was cheaper (I don’t know how the Uber driver made any substantial money). We picked up our permits and heard the warnings about bears and snow. Our last night in civilization was at Happy Isles campground.

Starting, 25 June 2017. L-R: Aras, Tim , Britney is just standing in, Vladas & Muir.

 

On 25 June 2017 we made our start on the trail. After a few pictures, we were slogging the long, steep grade up Nevada Falls. We had to pack food for more than a week on the trail before our first resupply as well as gear that we’d need in the snow. All of this considerations lead to some heavy backpacks. I don’t know for sure, but I’m guessing that my pack was in the range of 55-60 pounds and Vladas’ pack was likely heavier (but, he’s a much bigger and younger than me). Muir, Aras and the former girlfriend were likely carrying forty pounds or so. The first day to Little Yosemite Valley and beyond to Clouds Rest Junction were extremely difficult, especially for our first day at altitude. When we sighted a bear at Clouds Rest Junction, that was a good sign to enjoy our first stop. (Note: The geolocations I link here roughly came from my GPS.)

 

The second day, Aras, Vladas and the former girlfriend backtracked and summited Half Dome. This lead to a noon start on the trail. We first ran into snow when we reached an altitude of about 8500’, which was about ten miles into the trip. At that point the snow was instantly about four feet deep, when we could see bare soil/rock. From that point on, the trip was difficult. We were all tired from slipping and sliding, route finding (couldn’t see the trail under the snow) and navigating around tree wells (snow melted around trees to create “holes”). Our goal had been to make it to Sunrise to camp, but we ended up a mile or so short when we stopped about 8:00 pm. It was a rough night as we didn’t eat well and there wasn’t much water where we camped on a bald knoll.

Snow covered Long Meadow, 27 June 2017.

We slept in the third morning which caused another late start (~10:00 am) and spent most of the day slipping on the snow and route finding. There was beautiful scenery but the hiking was brutal. Vladas postholed deep late in the afternoon and it took twenty minutes to extricate him. The goal was to make it to Tuolumne Meadows, but we were well short when we decided to stop near Cathedral Lakes.

Camp near Cathedral Lakes

We had a good discussion that evening and realized that we were in over our heads given the conditions. Our trail pace was much slower than we’d hoped and we’d likely run out of food before we made it to Reds Meadow (if we made it, since we still had a few thousand feet more to climb over some passes). While we were likely hiking at a rate of about ten miles/day, our trail mileage was maybe half that with all of the walking around the tree wells. And, we still weren’t hiking over the higher passes where the snow would be even worse. We decided to bail out at Tuolumne Meadows and figure out next steps from there.

 

The end of that trip was bittersweet. We “failed” on the trip that we had hoped to make and for which we’d planned so hard. But, we were safe and humbled. We spent a couple of weeks bumming around the Sierras and San Francisco as our “backup” plan.

 

 

ACT II:

 

Not completing a goal like this – especially one where you’ve invested so much time and effort in planning and training – sticks in your craw. In the early fall of 2017, I told my wife that I’d like to try the JMT again and she was agreeable. When I told Aras that I wanted to make a second attempt, his response was on the order of “UGH!” But, we planned the trip, carefully, for the two of us during the winter of 2017/2018, starting from Tuolumne Meadows (where we’d ended). Again because of schedules, we had a similar window for going on the JMT. Unfortunately, we were not able to win a permit in the lottery to backpack the traditional JMT over Donohue Pass. But, we scored a permit to leave Yosemite over Parker/Koip Pass. The other good news is that the Sierra snowpack during the winter of 2017/2018 was about 20% of normal!

 

We took a bit more time to acclimate this time around by spending a couple of nights in Mammoth. We also significantly reduced our pack weights. I’m guessing that Aras started at less than 25 lbs and I was just under 30 lbs (better planning and paring, and less snow gear). We also started a few days later than the year before – 29 June.

 

We enjoyed one last civilized snack at Tuolumne Meadows and hitched our way to a late morning start at the Parker/Mono Pass Trailhead. The trail to Parker Pass was smooth and gently sloped. But, I thought that I’d lose Aras as we climbed the side of Parker Peak to get to Koip Pass – the altitude and effort got to him that first day (but, never again!). When we topped out on Koip Pass and could see Alger Lakes, we were pretty excited! We set up camp near Alger Lakes in the waning light, later than we wanted, but very satisfied with our first day’s effort.

 

Aras crossing Minaret Creek.

The second day started with frost and quickly warmed. The hike to the JMT from Alger Lakes was longer than I calculated, which was not encouraging. We made it to Thousand Island Lake for a late lunch and over to very crowded Garnet Lake for the night. (Day3) Our first resupply was at Reds Meadow the next day, but it was a slightly smoky hike there. The food at Reds was quite welcome as well as the shower.

 

It was on the second day that Aras and I had our favorite discovery of the whole trip – Rona & Jason, Oscar and Ron. I’m an introvert, so thinking of interacting with other people is not something that was on my radar when I was planning our JMT trips. We met many nice, wonderful, interesting people on the trip who made it fun. But, meeting Rona, Oscar and Ron on the trail late on the second day was the best thing that happened to us for many reasons. It turns out that Rona is originally a Midwesterner and went to college right here at the University of Wisconsin – Madison! And, her son, Oscar, is the same age as Aras, and they became fast friends on the trail. “Ron” is a very sweet Korean woman who surprised me with her strength and stamina. But, for most of the rest of the trip, we camped and ate together, cajoled each other and enjoyed each other’s company. Rona traded out with her husband, Jason, about half way through the trek, and I certainly appreciated Jason’s company, especially when I needed a break from Aras. 

 

(Day4)  The smoke from the Lions Fire near Reds Meadow the next morning still obscured our views but didn’t affect our breathing. We made it to Purple Lake for the night. I had hoped that we might make it Lake Virginia, as I’d heard it was beautiful, but a late start from Reds nixed that goal, and the smoke from the Lions Fire made for a hazy view at Lake Virginia as we found out the next day.  (Day5) Tully Hole was as mosquito infested as reported. The trail over Silver Pass was spectacular – one of my favorites! The ferry to Vermilion Valley Resort was waiting to leave when Rona & I arrived at Lake Thomas Edison. Vermilion Valley Resort was a wonderful stop. We enjoyed the food and especially enjoyed the company. Sitting around the bonfire there and listening to Pacific Crest Trail hikers tell their stories was wonderful.

 

The view along the John Muir Trail from Silver Pass, overlooking Chief Lake (left) and Warrior Lake (right), John Muir Wilderness, Sierra National Forest, Sierra Nevada Mountains, California, USA.

 

 

The view along the John Muir Trail – Marie Lake from Selden Pass; John Muir Wilderness, Sierra National Forest, Sierra Nevada Mountains, California, USA.

 

 

Taking a break in Mono Creek.

 

Along the JMT.

 

 

Aras approaching Selden Pass, with Marie Lake in the background.

(Day 6) Leaving VVR on the Fourth of July was tough – a bit of civility and comfort is difficult to let go. But, we slogged on in a bit of heat and made it to the west side of Bear Creek. (Day7) Marie Lake and the north side of Selden Pass were as spectacular as Silver Pass. When Aras & Oscar reached Sallie Keyes Lake, they decided it was a good time to jump in! At Muir Trail Ranch (MTR) we had to hustle to resupply (our last!) our bear canisters before MTR closed for the evening. Rona headed home the next morning and Jason started with fresh legs and a heavy load.  Video: Aras jumping into Sallie Keyes Lake

 

(Day8) After some searching we found John Muir Rock the next day. Our first night with Jason was at beautiful, but mosquito-filled, McClure Meadows, and supper on a boulder in the middle of Evolution Creek. (Day9) Next up was a beautiful hike around Evolution Lakes and then into the rocky alpine zones above before topping out on Muir Pass and its stone hut, before camping along the Middle Fork of the Kings River. (Day10) The following day had an easy morning but a warm afternoon climbing up Palisade Valley. At lunch, I slipped into Paradise Creek and dropped my water bottle and our primary water filter into the raging stream. I quickly decided that it was best to let them go and not chase them; fortune had it that an eddy brought them back to me! Oscar lead us up the Golden Staircase to the most beautiful campsite of our trip with a view over the valley.

 

 

Sunrise view over Palisade Creek Valley with the Devil’s Crags in the background.

 

Sunrise view at an unnamed lake (just downstream from Lake Marjorie).

 

Aras crossing Evolution Lake Inlet.

Aras & Tim take a break at Muir Hut.

(Day11)  The next morning was tough for me with the long slow climb to Mather Pass. The afternoon was mostly downhill with a last climb to another beautiful campsite at an unnamed lake just below Lake Marjorie. Near the Bench Lake Range Station, we started to hear that there was a forest fire near our planned exit at Whitney Portal that might cause us to change our plans. That evening we lost our knife between the boulders in the lake while trying to wash it – whoops! (Day12) It was an overcast morning climbing Pinchot Pass and beyond that gave way to nice camping weather at Arrowhead Lake. (Day13) Our brief time in the vicinity of Rae Lakes was overcast and the steep climb over Glen Pass may have been the most difficult for me. That night was spent at one of our higher campsites in the upper reaches of the Bubbs Creek Valley. (Day14) The next morning was a long, slow slog (for me) to get over Forrester Pass. The weather descending Forrester was overcast and cool and I worried about lightning as well as the mild rain. But, the cooler day was a blessing as I was able to hike more easily. We made it to Crabtree Meadows after a sixteen-mile day – our longest day of the trip! This is also where we collected our wag bags!!

 

As our trip was winding down we were talking of when and how to summit Mt. Whitney. We’d been worried about the possible difficulties of exiting at Whitney Portal because of the nearby fire and maybe needing to hike further south to Cottonwood. Fortunately, Whitney Portal opened a day or two before we arrived. We thought about camping high on Mount Muir at the Trail Crest site, but we would need to take lots of water with us. But, the benefit would have been arising early for a pre-dawn hike to enjoy sunrise on Mt. Whitney.

 

Aras’ “rain coat” wasn’t as helpful as he thought, so he used the tent groundcloth. 🙂 Photo courtesy of Jason.

Jason & me on Forrester Pass. Photo courtesy of Jason.

(Day15) In the end, we decided to get an earlier than usual start and hope to summit Mt. Whitney by noon or so, which we did (actually, a bit after noon). There was no real view on Mt. Whitney as it was socked in by the clouds, but we certainly enjoyed our accomplishment. I cried a bit when I was up there, happy and proud of our accomplishment, especially over two seasons. After a long, slippery and tough-on-the-knees downhill hike, we made it Whitney Portal about 5:00 pm. Of course, Aras and Oscar were waiting on me – Slow Poke – as usual. I was too tired to really eat much of anything and about as sore as I’d ever been. Our last day was about 4000 feet up, 7000 feet down and 19 miles. That night, we enjoyed our first real immersion into civilization in more than two weeks at a hotel in Lone Pine, along with a nice, hot shower!

 

 

Ron, Oscar, Jason, Aras & Tim on Mt. Whitney! Photo courtesy of Jason.

 

On top of Mt. Whitney! Goal attained!

 

In Act II we hiked about 200 miles over the fifteen days. This was one of the most meaningful and difficult accomplishments of my life, at least over a couple of weeks. I’d do it again, but I’d take my wife with me. As I write this now, five months later, I’ve regained most of the weight that I lost and I reminisce many times every day about this grand adventure – the ups and downs, and the wonderful people, especially Aras!

 

 

Closing thoughts:

 

I wish that I’d lost some weight prior to the trip. I was in generally good shape except I was carrying a few more pounds than I wish. The heat on the trail wasn’t that great, but the exertion and intense sun left me drenched in sweat. As often as I could I was wetting my shirt and hat to help me cool. I was the slowest person in our group which lead Aras to give me the trail nickname of Slow Poke.

 

I’m glad we pared our packweight between the two trips. It would have been a slower, more difficult trip carrying ten to twenty more pounds in Act II.

 

I’m glad that we went earlier in the season as the trail was relatively clean. I’ve heard stories about folks who went later in the season and found more human trail scat than they appreciated.

 

I heard about Rock Tape a couple of weeks before we left for Act II and it was wonderful! I highly recommend it for managing blisters and raw spots on feet and fingers.

 

I hope that you enjoy your own backpacking trips, whether on the JMT or elsewhere. These kind of trips are wonderful for cleansing the soul and humbling us in these modern times.

 

“The mountains are calling and I must go.”  ~~ John Muir

 

Lastly, here’s slidewho of about 300 photographs from along the trail – enjoy! You’ll likely enjoy it more if you view full screen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in backpacking, bucket list, California, John Muir Trail, Sierra Nevada Mountains Also tagged , , , , , , , |

Salkantay & Machu Picchu – bucket list!

Cordillera Urupampa, Sacred Valley, Peru

Cordillera Urupampa, Sacred Valley, Peru

 

It’s nearly Thanksgiving and cold, dreary November is upon us. Fortunately, we were able to get out and enjoy a little sun and exercise a few weeks ago.

 

As with many people, we have a bucket list of things we’d like to do and places we’d like to see. On that list was Machu Picchu in Peru. You know, those large, wonderful Incan ruins that sit atop a mountain, overlooking a river valley, surrounded by the Andes Mountains. Most everyone has seen pictures of it, and it was on our bucket list because of the Incan culture, traveling to Peru and enjoying its contemporary culture and being in the Andes.

 

Going to Machu Picchu takes some planning. One of the major planning issues is how you’ll approach Machu Picchu. The route that most visitors take is to arrive in Cusco, Peru and acclimatize for a few days at the higher altitude. From there, the majority of visitors will take the train from Cusco to the tourist town of Aguas Calientes that is just below Machu Picchu. Alternatively, it is also possible to take a bus or other road transportation to the town of Ollantaytambo in Peru’s Sacred Valley and then take the train from there to Aguas Calientes. The total travel time by driving to Ollantaytambo is slightly shorter. The second most popular way to make your way to Aguas Calientes and Machu Picchu is to walk the 26-mile long Inca Trail, which starts in Ollantaytambo. One of the people who first made me most aware of Machu Picchu walked the Inca Trail with his wife about twenty years ago. Today, the Inca Trail is extremely popular and crowded; you’ll have the opportunity to share it each day with five hundred of your closest friends – 200 hikers and 300 Peruvian porters/guides, along with their accumulated debris, detritus and flotsam. But, the allure of the Inca Trail is that you’ll also have the opportunity to view and visit several other Incan ruins along the way, and to say that you did it!

 

Finally, if you’re like us and love your adventures, the mountains and a bit of exertion, there’s a third way – the Salkantay Trail. The route is more difficult and at a higher altitude and, the scenery is spectacular, especially the Humantay and Salkantay mountains. In fact, the altitude is a significant issue on this trek, but not insurmountable. Getting to the trailhead requires a bit more effort as it’s necessary to take small buses from Cusco to the trailhead near Mollepata. You’ll only have to share the route with a couple of dozen folks each day (I suspect, as we didn’t see very many people hiking on the trail). On the Salkantay Trail, along with various guides and porters, you’re also permitted to take pack animals (mules and horses) which can carry your gear (or you, if the situation requires); pack animals aren’t allowed on the Inca Trail. Along the Salkantay Trail there are several minimalist shelters – medium-sized outbuildings surrounded by blue plastic tarps. The wind can blow so fiercely in poor conditions on the Salkantay that we saw backpackers who set up their tents inside of these shelters, just to reduce the savagery of the elements.

 

Lastly, it is possible to hike the Salkantay Trail while staying in the wonderful Mountain Lodges of Peru (MLP) facilities. Oh my stars!!! We’ve never done anything quite like this in the past. Yes, we love to travel and camp and eat, but we’ve never thought about a luxury adventure trip until some of our good friends did this same trip a few years ago and raved about it. As much as I like being outdoors and hiking and in the middle of nowhere, I’m also getting “mature” (soft?) enough that I also enjoy a warm shower at the end of a hard day and a comfortable bed. If you’re similarly “mature” or otherwise aligned, then this trek might appeal to you.

 

Overlooking the Plaza de Armas, Cusco

Overlooking the Plaza de Armas, Cusco

 

Let’s start at the beginning – Cusco, Peru. After traveling for the better part of a day from home to Chicago and Miami, we arrived in Cusco just in time for breakfast. After retrieving my luggage from another American who thought that his bag looked like mine (close, but no banana), we took a taxi to the small B&B where we stayed, the Quinua Villa Boutique. Before the Spanish arrived in the mid Sixteenth Century, Cusco was the capitol of the Incan empire. Even after the Spanish arrived, the major modes of transportation were feet, horses and carriages. The older parts of town are narrow and there’s not much room for a car or other vehicle to drive. Our taxi driver offered to carry our baggage from the nearest street up the hill to the Quinua, but being a tough guy, I figured I could make it a hundred meters with mine – wrong! Who stole my oxygen?! Cusco sits at an altitude of ~11,200′, which is only 11,000′ higher than home. Our two days in Cusco were not easy if an uphill climb was required, and that was the case when we walked downhill to visit the famous Plaza de Armas.

 

Our second day in the area was spent on a Sacred Valley tour – Chincero, Salinas de Maras (salt works), Moray Terraces, Ollantaytambo and the Sacred Valley (the valley of the Urubamba River). As much as I enjoyed seeing these various Incan sites, the scenery and just being in the Peruvian countryside was wonderful. For all of the travels that we’ve done, there are relatively few places that I’d like to visit again and get to know better, but Peru is definitely on that short list. Peru has had it’s difficulties in the past with cocaine and terrorists, but the worst of those days are past. Everywhere that we went, we felt safe and people were very nice to us.

 

We got our formal start on the Salkantay Trail on the third day. Our wonderful MLP guides, Admil and Ricky, picked us up near our B&B at 7:00 am, and we headed west out of town with four other couples. After a few stops, we arrived at a couple of trailheads beyond the village of Mollepata. Half of our group hiked nine miles the first day when they started at Marco Casa, a few miles after Mollepata. The other half of us started at Challacancha and hiked just four miles. We encountered about an hour’s worth of mild rain that afternoon – and that was the last time that we were rained on while hiking for the whole trip – lucky us!!! The first forty five minutes or so of hiking were uphill, but then it was flat after that as we followed a small canal most of the way to our first lodge at Soraypampa. I’ve stayed in several nice places before but none of them was in the middle of nowhere. We had warm water and showers, a nice big, warm bed, a hot tub and mucho gusto food. We stayed at Soraypampa lodge for two nights so that we could acclimatize to the higher altitude, which was about 12,500′. Soraypampa Lodge is at the end of the road, and it was the last time we’d see a road for a couple of days.

 

Salkantay Lodge

Salkantay Lodge, with Humantay Mountain in the clouds on the middle left and Salkantay in the clouds up the valley

 

Lago Humantay, with Humantay Glacier and Mountain behind

Lago Humantay, with Humantay Glacier and Mountain behind

Receiving a blessing

Receiving a blessing

 

After our first night at Soraypampa, we enjoyed a wonderful breakfast and then set out on a four- to five-mile “warm-up” hike to Humantay Lake, which also is a climb of about 1300′. Yes, the climbing was taxing, as we still hadn’t fully adjusted to the altitude. The view at Humantay Lake is spectacular! The lake itself is a beautiful turquoise blue, and it’s surrounded on three sides by the mountains. Humantay Glacier’s moraine sits at the south end, blocking the flow of the snowmelt. We were treated to a moving ceremony at Humantay, an offering from a Quechua (native) priest to the mountain goddess, Pachamama, and the sun god, Inti, for our good luck and good health on our trek and in life.

 

At this point, allow me to tell you about our fellow hikers. First, our guides, Admil and Ricky, were absolutely wonderful, caring, respectful, knowledgeable and fun. Finest kind! Second, we were part of an equally wonderful group of people – four couples from the US and one couple from Perth, Australia. Age wise, the group ranged from mid-30s to about 70. Two of the men were mountain climbers and not phased by the altitude and conditions; they brought their wives on this trip to enjoy the altitude and scenery, but in relatively comfortable conditions. About half of our group had run marathons in their lives, and the group was relatively fit. But, there were a couple of people who had never done anything quite like this before – hiking at this altitude – in their lives and they readily made the trip special for us all. In fact, everyone was most proud of them because these two people climbed the highest mountains on this trip, pushing their personal boundaries to new limits.

 

The third day was our big day – at least, that’s how we all built it up to be. We were on the trail by 7:00 am and slowly rising toward the Salkantay Pass. The climb was gentle and we all kept a reasonably moderate pace. A small, scenic meadow (pampa) with a shelter and camping area was our last significant stop before heading up the switchbacks to the pass. I seem to recall that it was “only” about an hour after that significant rest stop before we made the pass, but it seemed longer, arriving about 11:00 am. The scene at the pass was very dramatic with clouds blowing around Salkantay, playing hide-and-seek between us and the mountain. While I’ve hiked to over 14,000′ before in Colorado, this was different. In Colorado, we were on the top of Mt. Elbert, the second highest mountain in the continental 48 states, and looking down on everything around us. At Salkantay Pass, we were at ~15,200′ and Montaña Salkantay is still towering over us, another mile or so higher! It was a very humbling, but grand, experience. The pass is filled with hundreds of cairns from past hikers, giving thanks for making the trek and enjoying the experience. We left our own group cairn, complete with a coca leaf for Pachamama. Onward and downward…  A nice, warm lunch met us about an hour later, and it was well-received, appreciated and enjoyed by everyone. An hour or so after lunch, we were relaxing in Wayra Lodge, enjoying pisco sours and the hot tub (remember, this was a lux trip – sorry).

On the path to Salkantay

On the path to Salkantay

Salkantay-7

The steepest part is yet to come

Salkantay Pass

On top of the world!

 

Our fourth day was relatively easy and anti-climatic. The “big” day had been the day before and we were all happy and healthy. Since we were going downhill, the weather was warmer – no need for bundling up. We entered the cloud forest at lower elevations (we were still above nine and ten thousand feet, though), and started to attract the occasional mosquito.  And, about half of us finished the day by enjoying a zip line across the small valley that we had to cross to get to Colpa Lodge. We arrived relatively early, around lunch time, and enjoyed a late lunch of local delicacies including cuy (guinea pig). OK, not everyone enjoyed cuy, but I certainly did!

IMG_0938

Cuy – it’s what’s for lunch!

Day five was warmer yet, and we hiked down the Rio Santa Teresa Valley. Along this part of the hike, the flowers of the cloud forest appeared more and more, and were a wonderful diversion. Along the trail, there was another warm, tasty, locally-prepared lunch waiting for us. I could get used to hiking like this! Near the village of La Playa, we were picked up in a small bus and transported a few kilometers down and to the other side of the valley. After being dropped off, we made a short ascent to the last lodge, Lucma Lodge, and enjoyed another fine meal and pisco sours. As an aside here, let me also write that most everyone on our trip was very prepared for hiking Salkantay Pass – the possibility of cold, miserable rain and the altitude. But, since we focused so much on that aspect of the hike, we tended to be underprepared for the remainder of the Salkantay Trek – too many cold weather clothes and not enough warm weather clothes!

 

Our last significant day of hiking dawned beautiful and pleasant. Since this was the day when we were to get our first glimpse of Machu Picchu from a distance, I brought most all of my camera gear, and this may have been a mistake. On this day, our hike was about 2000 feet up and 3000 feet down. The hike up was along an ancient Incan route. The hiking up wasn’t difficult, but it was still a 2000 foot climb in some of the warmest conditions we’d “enjoyed,” along with some humidity. After we passed through a saddle on the range, we arrived at Llactapata, an Incan outpost, and there it was – Machu Picchu! Seeing Machu Picchu for the first time, whether near or far, is just breathtaking! Standing at Llactapata, it seemed more like an island in these mountainous jungles than in any other image that I’ve seen of it. Seeing Machu Picchu after the many days of hiking was also quite uplifting. After about thirty minutes of taking it all in and resting a bit, we had a rugged downhill hike to our last wonderful, warm lunch on the trail. We’re also very fortunate on this particular day that it wasn’t raining, as the trail from Llactapata down to the Rio Ahobamba was the steepest trail that we traversed, and it was also quite rocky and slippery – which would have been worse on a wet day. And, woe is me, yes, I was still carrying my heavy load of gear down this slope. By the end of the trail at the Hidroelectrica Train Station, my legs were burning and knees quite sore. The good news is that we took the train to Aguas Calientes, which is the hopping off point to reach Machu Picchu, marched through town to the Inkaterra Hotel, and had a hot shower and delicious meal.

 

Machu Picchu from Llactapata

 

On our last day together, we were up early as usual and caught a bus up to Machu Picchu. I don’t feel that any of us was really in the mood to hike up to it. Again, that first full view of Machu Picchu is just breathtaking. It’s amazing to think that the Incans lived here, maybe not for very long, but that they lived here, on top of the world, and the Spanish never knew that it existed. While I could go on describing Machu Picchu in words, the photographs are much more appealing. Our group took in the Inca Drawbridge, a very secure “back” entrance into Machu Picchu, walked through the ruins, and then half of us climbed to the top of Huayna Picchu on the far end of the park. The hike up Huayna Picchu is steep, but there are more ruins at the top of it and the view is overwhelming, and it’s not a view that appears in many photographs that you may have previously seen. After descending, we gathered at the main tourist entrance and that was it – our wonderful group began to go its own ways. One couple stayed on top, while the rest returned to Aguas Calientes for lunch and then more departures. It was sad to part with everyone after having spent such an intense week together – living, hiking and laughing.

 

Salkantay-8

First glimpse of Machu Picchu

 

Inca Drawbridge

Inca Drawbridge at Machu Picchu

 

Machu Picchu from Huayna Picchu

Machu Picchu from Huayna Picchu

Asta and I spent one more day at Machu Picchu so that we could also climb Montaña Machu Picchu, which is higher than Huayna Picchu and affords an even grander view of Machu Picchu, the surrounding Andes Mountains and the Rio Vilcanota that seems like it’s Machu Picchu’s moat. I was very glad that this was the last day, as my knees were quite sore by this time. The hike up the mountain was less steep, but more difficult and longer than going up Huayna Picchu. Inti smiled on us while we were on top, as the sun was out, giving us a dazzling view all around. Unfortunately, there were clouds behind us and we were unable to catch a glimpse of Montaña Salkantay to the south – oh well. After a slow climb down, I took one more lap around the ruins while Asta whet her thirst at the tourist bar with a local Cusqueña cerveza.

 

Machu Picchu from Montana Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu from Montaña Machu Picchu

 

Following is the gallery of all images from our Peru trip – lots of photographs of Machu Picchu. Remember, click on the gallery below to view it full screen!

 

 

And, there you have it. A wonderful week of traveling, hiking, eating, aching, and laughing in the Peruvian Andes, and being overwhelmed by Montaña Salkantay and Machu Picchu. There was only one thing missing from this trip and I didn’t miss it (them) that much until we returned home – the kids…

 

I hope that you’ll take your opportunities to check things and places off of your bucket list so that you have wonderful memories to last the rest of your life. In our case, we can never have enough memories and rich, warm experiences and new friends.

 

‘Til next time, this is 43 N MSN signing off…

 
 
 

Posted in cusco, machu picchu, peru, salkantay trail Also tagged , , , , , , , , |

Key Summit

[landscapephotograph description=”Key Summit Panorama, looking toward Lake Marion” photoname=”Key Summit” photo=”http://www.timmulholland.com/wordpress1/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/KeySummitPan3.jpg” photourl=”http://illuminataphoto.zenfolio.com/p606278338/h5729FD90#h5729fd90″][/landscapephotograph]

Let’s see…  It’s been more than a year since we hiked/tramped up to Key Summit in Fiordland National Park in southwest New Zealand. In may ways, it feels like it was just yesterday and in other ways it feels like I was another person then. Key Summit was one of our favorite hikes for the whole year – outstanding views, great weather and a hike that was “just right” – except for the part where Mom said, “hey, let’s go just a little bit further…” I believe that the “little bit further” parts doubled the length of the whole hike.

 

 

The Key Summit Track follows the route of the Routeburn Track, one of New Zealand’s many famous multi-day tramps, for the first couple of kilometers. We had spent the night in Te Anau, I believe, and then drop the road towards Milford. About 45 minutes from Te Anau is a parking area called “The Divide,” and this is the starting point for the Routeburn Track and Key Summit Track. There’s also a bus stop at The Divide for those folks who are looking for transportation to/from the Routeburn Track so that they can hike from one end to the other, and leave they’re vehicle at the other end (or, be picked up by the bus).

 

 

The day that we hiked started out pleasantly cool (hats and gloves weather) and once we got a bit higher and above the trees it was time to open the jackets and air out a bit. I don’t recall the route being all that memorable until you get to the top of Key Summit and then the vistas open up in all directions! SPECTACULAR! There’s not a lot to write about the hike itself. It wasn’t difficult, but it wasn’t easy. It takes a bit of effort to hike upward to Key Summit, but once you’re “on top,” most of the hiking is relatively flat. And, like many hikes, it was easier to hike downhill back to the car at The Divide.

 

 

There were a few other hikers/trampers already up on Key Summit, so we weren’t alone. At the main point of interest, there are several beautiful, fragile little tarns (alpine ponds/lakes). You can see for many miles in every direction from atop Key Summit. One of our favorite views from Key Summit was looking across the valley to see Lake Marion, a beautiful lake to which we had hiked a couple of months earlier, a few days before Christmas.

 

 

As noted earlier, someone in our party kept saying “hey, let’s hike just a little farther…”  The additional steps were interesting and gave us a different perspective hiking along the ridge between Lake Fergus and Lake McKellar, more time in the warm sun, and more time to growl – are we there yet? After another mile or two of walking south on a poorly defined track, we came to a knoll and the our learless feeder said that we could return to the car.

 

 

Unlike other postings that I’ve written, the gallery for this one is not extensive – you’ll be able to enjoy it in a few minutes – and, I do hope that you’ll enjoy it. And, I’ve thrown in a couple of other photographs from Te Anau and a nearby waterfall, Humboldt Falls, which is at the end of a long drive in Fiordland National Park.

 

 

‘Til next time, this is 43 N MSN signing off…

 

 

Posted in Fiordland, Key Summit, Lake Marian, Milford, New Zealand Also tagged , , , , , , , , , |

Moeraki Boulders

[landscapephotograph description=”Moeraki Boulders, New Zealand” photoname=”Moeraki Boulders” photo=”http://www.timmulholland.com/wordpress1/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/MoerakiBoulders-6c.jpg” photourl=”http://timmulholland.photoshelter.com/image/I0000PavdToOpgxg”][/landscapephotograph]

 

 

It’s hard to believe that it’s been nearly a month since my last post.  Time flies when you’re having fun in Australia.

 

 

On the big trip around New Zealand in January, one of our first significant stops were the famous Moeraki Boulders, a few kilometers north of Dunedin on the South Island’s east coast. The Moeraki Boulders aren’t exactly spectacular like a lot of New Zealand’s mountain scenery, but they’re still awe-inspiring in their own way. These boulders (and other similar boulders around the world) are concretions that were formed when minerals (calcite) seeped into the interstitial spaces between mud and sand grains and “hardened.” Don’t ask me exactly why these minerals hardened; similarly, don’t ask me why these concretions are so nicely spherical in shape. Just chalk it up to some of the wonderful geological mysteries of Nature.  (Yes, I know that I’m a guy and that I’m supposed to know everything, but let’s just leave it at that.) I’m not going to write a whole lot this time and just leave you to enjoy the gallery at your own pace.

 

46 S EnZed signing off…

Posted in Dunedin, Moeraki Boulders, New Zealand Also tagged , , , , , , , , |

Secret Falls

[landscapephotograph description=”Secret Falls, near Leland, Wisconsin” photoname=”Secret Falls” photo=”http://timmulholland.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/SecretFalls-3585.jpg” photourl=”http://timmulholland.photoshelter.com/image/I0000VpKJ6xxiW60″][/landscapephotograph]

 

I’m home…

 

Actually, no, we’re still in New Zealand (just got back from a beautiful weekend in Wellington), but I have some photographs from “home” that I want to share. Wisconsin has quite a few beautiful locations (though, not quite as many as New Zealand).

 

There’s this one special place that I know that’s literally “buried” in the Baraboo Hills and I found it in the strangest way – literally (sonically? aurally?), by keeping my ears open. I photographed a wedding in Sauk Prairie in the spring of 2008. The reception was at the Lake Wisconsin Country Club. It had been a good day, but when the wedding party settled into their suppers, it was nice to take a break. I was sitting at the bar, likely enjoying a gratis soda, when two guests sidled up to the bar, ordered Oddbins Vodka drinks and started talking. A couple of guys… I wasn’t trying to pay any attention to them – really! But, I could make out some of their words:  waterfall, wisconsin society of ornithology, and I don’t remember what else. I tucked those few words away and spent the rest of the evening enjoying and recording the festivities (especially when the wedding party borrowed some golf carts and we went around the course and took some memorable photographs!).

 

After I edited the portraits and presented them to the couple, I started to perform my research on this mystery waterfall that may or may not exist. The bad news is that there wasn’t a whole lot to go on. The good news is that my skills and resources did provide me some good starting points. I contacted a good friend who is a major bird lover – and significant on the state and national level with the National Audobon Society. He provided me some good leads, but didn’t know the land for which I was searching. He did suggest that I do some additional research on the Wisconsin Society of Ornithology, which I did. I contacted a friend at the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and he did know about the waterfall that I was seeking. In fact, he’d been there! But, he wouldn’t tell me because the waterfall resided on non-DNR lands and he didn’t want to let the cat out of the bag. The good news is that he did provide me some basic information and let me know that I was on the right track – the Honey Creek State Natural Area.

 

So, between weddings and other work, I took some time to do some exploring on at the Honey Creek State Natural Area (SNA), which is just a few miles northwest of Leland, Sauk County, Wisconsin (fyi – Natural Bridge State Park is just a few miles northeast of Leland and Hemlock Draw SNA is just north of town). I took four separate trips to Honey Creek. The first three trips I walked all over the property and found a lot of interesting land, streams, plants, and so on – but no waterfall. Along Honey Creek, there are some beautiful sandstone walls that have been carved out by the Creek. After walking all over the Honey Creek SNA and coming home covered with mud, sweat and scratches, I decided that it was time to get a little smarter.

 

Based on the information that I had, I also knew that The Nature Conservancy had interest in the Honey Creek property so I made a little research trip down to the Wisconsin Chapter of The Nature Conservancy. I explained to a staff member what I was seeking at Honey Creek and he showed me a map of the area that noted The Nature Conservancy’s property. Lo and behold, it turns out that The Nature Conservancy owned a little piece of land just north of the Honey Creek SNA.Voila! That was the good news. The bad news is that The Nature Conservancy’s property wasn’t contiguous with the Wisconsin Society of Ornithology property, but maybe a thousand feet north.

 

A few days later, I made another trip to Honey Creek and went further and deeper than I’d ventured before. Now, it was getting later in the spring/early summer and the weather was getting warmer and more humid. And, the mosquitoes were starting to come out! I hiked through the weeds along the stream bank and slogged up stream as far as I’d been before and then went further. There was a reasonably clear property line on the north end of the Honey Creek SNA. Having worked for the Wisconsin DNR for many years, I have some knowledge about the rules regarding property, trespassing, and who owns what, etc. The State of Wisconsin owns all of the water in the State, up to the common high water mark (or something like that). That meant that I could walk in Honey Creek and not trespass on the private property owner’s land, and continue my watery hike north to the other sliver of Nature Conservancy land. Eventually, I came to a small side stream that had a pretty good flow, and some really attractive pink quartzite in its bed. (Yes, I do get excited by some odd things in the beds that I visit!)

 

Another few hundred feet up the side stream and there it was – the most beautiful waterfall that I’ve ever seen in Wisconsin!!! It was very satisfying and inspiring to have spent these past few weeks searching, busting my butt, coming out of the woods wet and stinking, and then to be sitting there in front of it.  I can’t remember how long I spent there, enjoying it, soaking it up, and photographing it. It was relatively small and intimate, but surrounded by beautiful green foliage, and the pink quartzite really set it all off.  In some ways, this was quite the highlight of my summer.  And, to make for a great autumn, I went to “Secret Falls” in the late September, just as the trees were turning a bit, and as the mosquitoes were migrating south.

 

And, that’s the last time that I visited Secret Falls until last May. As Memorial Day was approaching, we were thinking of things to do in the area, and heading back to Secret Falls had been on my “to do” list for quite some time. The family was game for a decent hike, and we dragged along a great friend who also loves to hike. Unfortunately, I didn’t do a satisfactory job of adequately describing the hike and conditions to everyone. While I wore long pants and shirt, I forgot to suggest to everyone else that they might want to do likewise. When I hiked to Secret Falls, it usually took me about 90 minutes to get there from my parked car. But, my crew was slower, the weather was quite hot and humid, and they didn’t appreciate all of the stinging nettles along the way. To avoid the nettles and tall weeds, they all hiked in the stream bed for a good portion of the hike. If you haven’t hiked in a stream bed before, it’s not very easy – you’re sloshing through the water, you can’t see your footing very well, there are rocks and cobbles all over the stream bed and they make your feet and ankles hurt. Also remember that some of my victim’s legs were much shorter than mine, so there was another aspect of the death march that wasn’t appreciated. After about three hours of hiking and whining, we finally made it to Secret Falls! My family and friend did appreciate Secret Falls as being a very beautiful waterfall, but they also felt that the price of admission was higher than I had lead them to believe. Below is a small gallery of photographs from this last trip to Secret Falls. After the seemingly never ending hike, I had to rescue my victims by taking them to the nearest lunch stop, which happened to be at a bar in Leland.

 

My family is now much more wary when I suggest a hike…  🙂

 

 

 

 

And, here’s a gallery from my 2008 trips:

 

As an expression of my appreciation to The Nature Conservancy for all that they do, and particularly at Honey Creek, I donated a very large canvas print of Secret Falls to their Madison office.

 

Finally, if you’re also a glutton for punishment, here’s a map and GPS coordinates that will help you to find Secret Falls – but don’t blame me if you come back hot, sweaty, sore and happy!

 

Modified DNR map showing TNC land in red to the north of the Honey Creek SNA.

Modified DNR map showing TNC land in red to the north of the Honey Creek SNA.

46 S EnZed signing off…

 

 

Posted in Secret Falls, Uncategorized, Wisconsin Also tagged , , , , , , , |

Rakiura

In mid-December, we went on a family adventure and tramped (hiked) across New Zealand along with several of our crazy friends here. Yes, I know that that sounds very impressive, especially something to be accomplished over a weekend with two children in tow, but I’m making it out to be more than it was. Yes, we did hike “across” New Zealand, but it was one of the narrowest possible spots, and it also involved a water taxi taking us from the end of our hike to the nearest town…

 

 

Just a few kilometers south of Invercargill is the town of Bluff, and then south of Bluff is… The Southern Ocean. The first stop in the Southern Ocean south of Bluff is Stewart Island – or, Rakiura, the Maori name for the island. The wikipedia article to which I’ve linked provides a nice writeup about the Maori mythology surrounding Rakiura and the two main New Zealand islands. I believe that Rakiura owes its existence to volcanoes and near volcanoes pushing up the earth’s surface in that area. On a clear day, we can see the mountains of Rakiura from our house in Invercargill. It looks so close and inviting, but there’s the issue of the Foveaux Strait with which to contend. Now, some crazy person or people have actually swam the thirty kilometers or so from Rakiura to Bluff, but that wasn’t our style. We flew out of the Invercargill airport on a puddle jumper and landed on the beach at Mason Bay on the west side of Rakiura. It was a beautiful, clear morning for a flight and the views of the ocean and Rakiura were spectacular. Landing on the beach was breathtaking, too!  When most every other flight that you’ve taken involves taking off and landing at a proper airport, it’s pretty interesting to land on the firm, but softer, sand of the beach with the waves crashing not too far away.

 

 

Flight path from Invercargill to Mason Bay Beach
Flight path from Invercargill to Mason Bay Beach

 

 

As a bit of an aside, the beach at Mason Bay is very long and it’s an excellent place to walk and explore – which we did. One of the more remarkable aspects about Mason Beach is how far up the sides of the hills that the sand extends – a couple of hundred meters up the side of the hills and several hundred meters inland. When we were flying in, I noticed this and was struck by how high and far back the sand extends from the beach and shore. I later learned that there’s a very good explanation for why the sand extends so far inland – a meteorite! Actually, earth scientists believe it was a comet – the Mahuika comet. The comet struck just west of Stewart Island in about 1443 AD and caused a tsunami that was ten times larger than the tsunami that struck Japan in 2011. This comet strike and the resulting tsunami wave pushed the sands way up and into Stewart Island. More importantly, there are reasonable hypotheses that the tsunami may have wiped out a significant portion of the low-lying Maori settlements all over New Zealand (which would have been most of them), and a very large tsunami would also help to explain why there is so little evidence of Maori settlement in New Zealand prior to about the 16th century.

 

 

The weather was warm, windy and pleasant on the beach at Mason Bay and we had most of the first day available to explore it. We walked up and down the beach and found many treasures. The most interesting treasures were several pilot whale skulls that we found toward the south end of the beach, and then a minke whale skull at the north end of the beach.  When you lift one of these skulls (or, try to lift) and find out how heavy they are, you realize why it’s better for a whale to enjoy the buoyancy of saltwater.  We also saw our one (and only?) kiwi while near Mason Bay!  It just sort of appeared on the track to the hut in mid-morning, which is unusual since kiwis tend to be nocturnal.

 

 

After a long day of walking, exploring and swimming, we spent a pleasant night camped near the hut and enjoyed a large meal with our local friends as well as the local wildlife – a.k.a., “sandflies.” Sandflies are one thing that we won’t miss at all about New Zealand!

 

 

Hiking path from Mason Bay Hut to Freshwater Landing, and then the water taxi route to Oban
Hiking path from Mason Bay Hut to Freshwater Landing, and then the water taxi route to Oban

The next morning, we got up at a decent time and slowly started to meander the fourteen kilometers from the Mason Bay Hut to the Freshwater Landing Hut. The track wasn’t particularly difficult.  It was relatively flat and level, with several hundred meters crossing swamps on elevated boardwalks that are basically wide enough for one person. Every so often, there’s a slightly wider portion so that trampers walking in the opposite direction can pass. The weather was quite warm and the winds that we enjoyed on the beach weren’t quite reaching inland.  So, this long of a hike, with backpacks and whining (or, as they say in New Zealand “wingeing” [(Australia, New Zealand, UK, slang) To complain whiningly])  kids, warm/hot weather, a beating sun and not enough drinking water was not exceedingly pleasant. The kids dropped their tiny backpacks early and dad carried them most of the way, at his own pace, leaving mom to enjoy those wingeing kids.

 

 

It only took maybe four hours to make it to Freshwater Landing, but it was a long four hours. The good news is that there’s a nice dock there and it was EXCELLENT and REFRESHING to jump off the dock and into river! After about an hour’s rest at Freshwater Landing, our water taxi picked us up and we made our way to the landing on the south side of Oban. After one last little hike over the hill from the south side to the main part of Oban and finding the ferry terminal, we made a merry retreat to the local pub and enjoyed the incoming rain and libations from the confines there. And, from Oban, we enjoyed the hour-long ferry ride back to Bluff, and then a bus ride back to Invercargill.

 

 

For those of you who might be wondering, would I recommend a trip to Stewart Island/Rakiura?  YES!  🙂

 

 

Enjoy the gallery!

46 S EnZed signing off…

 

 

Posted in hike, New Zealand, Rakiura, Stewart Island, tramp, whale Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Lake Marian

Just a few days before Christmas and a couple of days after Muir arrived (and, he still had a bit of jet lag), we took a day trip to Fiordland National Park with the intent of tramping (hiking) to Lake Marian.  In October, we had hiked to Marian Falls, which was only about a half mile, but we got drenched in the process.  Hiking to Lake Marian has been on our radar ever since.

  

So, we loaded up the car and made the three-hour drive to the trailhead.  One of the nice parts of the hike is that there’s a suspension bridge just as you begin that crosses the Hollyford River and gives you a little early excitement. The hike is “only” about two miles, but it felt like it was a little longer than that.  We were surrounded by the forest much of the time and didn’t realize (until recently – more in a later post) how much of an uphill trudge it was to get to Lake Marian.  Another reason that the hike seemed a little longer is that I was carrying my heavy load of camera equipment as well as food, water and some spare clothes (the weather did seem a bit cool and dodgy that day).  The Lake Marian Track is a very popular route in Fiordland National Park as evidenced by the trail erosion.  And, another factor in the trail erosion were the couple of very obvious rockslides. It’s very easy to locate rockslides on New Zealand’s trails – they have signs that say “DO NOT STOP FOR THE NEXT 200 METERS!”

  

After about an hour of sorta strenuous hiking, all of the sudden we came out into this opening with a very large glacial cirque/bowl that’s filled with a beautiful turquoise lake!  There were only a few other trampers/hikers at the lake and it was absolutely gorgeous place to enjoy a picnic lunch and lighten the rucksacks.  I think that Muir enjoyed one of his first major tastes of New Zealand’s landscape!  I hope that the gallery at the end of this post does justice to Lake Marian.  And, Lake Marian provided a beautiful setting for a very special family portrait.

  

  

After hiking down from Lake Marian, we “forced” Muir to ride to the end of the road and see Milford Sound and he did seem to be a bit impressed.  I was also able to capture one of my favorite photographs (so far) from New Zealand.  This photograph was taken looking west from near the Homer Tunnel entrance and down the Cleddau River Valley:

  

 

  

After enjoying Fiordland, we stopped in Te Anau and enjoyed supper before driving home.  Surprisingly, on the way home, Muir quickly fell asleep – so much for being a high-energy young adult (with jet lag).

  

And, we understand that our friends Jolanta, Asta and Gedis also enjoyed the Lake Marian hike when they visited Fiordland in early February – it’s a truly special place and hike!

  

  

46 S EnZed signing off…

    

Posted in Fiordland, Lake Marian, Milford, New Zealand Also tagged , , , , , , , , , |

McLean Falls

 

In one of my first posts from New Zealand, I wrote about our visit to McLean Falls and other places and displayed some photographs from that trip. Over these past six months or so, we’ve driven past the McLean Falls turnoff several times and hadn’t gotten back. There are so many beautiful things to see in the Catlins that we’ve been spreading ourselves around.

 

In early February, we had guests in our home. Coming all of the way from Madison, they felt the need to visit the Catlins, in part because of our raving about it and hopefully because they had viewed some of my photographs. So, we made the trip to McLean Falls and several other places. But, this trip piqued my desire to get back to McLean Falls by myself and really “work” the area.

 

So, a few days later, I dropped the kids off at school and dashed over to McLean Falls. The weather was in my favor – overcast with a slight chance of rain. Excellent lighting for a waterfall and forest where bright sun light can create a lot of high-contrast problems (and opportunities) for outdoor photographers. It takes about an hour to drive from Invercargill to McLean Falls, and then maybe another fifteen minutes to walk up to the main fall. I’m one of these photographers who likes to enjoy these kinds of places all by myself – just like everyone else. It wasn’t surprising, then, to find that there were many cars and campervans in the parking lot. And, when I made it to the top, yes, there were several people milling about. This kind of shooting requires a little patience as people move in and out of the places that I want to shoot, as well as some other creative techniques to manage how these people appear (and don’t appear) in my final photographs.

 

It was an excellent, gratifying day at McLean Falls. The weather was pleasant and humid, with hints of threatening rain, but only threatening. There were other visitors milling around the area of the Falls, but there weren’t so many people that it was difficult to shoot. At the top of the McLean Falls walk, you can stand away from the Falls and take in the whole of the Falls. Or, you can be a bit more adventurous and climb some rocks and get closer to the base of the top, and tallest, waterfall. Further down, there are four or five cascades of various height that require some climbing (and slipping) to get into a decent position for a nice photograph. The following gallery provides some flavor of the McLean Falls Conservation Area – quaint, simple, easy and beautiful.

 

 

46 S EnZed signing off…

Posted in Catlins, McLean Falls Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Mt. Burns Tarns

Like many of our weekends, we were off hiking recently – this time to the Mt. Burns Tarns.  A tarn is a small pond or lake that sits on the side of a mountain and they are formed by glacial activity, freeze-thaw conditions and erosion by ice.  Photographers and hikers are drawn to them because they tend to be a little remote, they’re very picturesque and they’re also very relaxing and serene.

 

 

Unlike in the United States, a great deal of New Zealand’s more remote country is not very accessible by land vehicles.  These Kiwis like to tramp!  But, the Mt. Burns Tarns are easily accessible from the Borland Road in Fiordlands National Park.  Borland Road is basically a utility service road so that the electric company can keep track of its transmission line pylons from the Manapouri Hydro station up and over the Hunter Mountains as the line works its way south and east towards Invercargill and the Tiwai Aluminum Smelter.

 

 

Driving to the Mt. Burns Tarns parking area on the Borland Road is pretty straightforward.  But, once the hike starts, it’s fairly vertical.  The hiking is through mounds of tussock grass along the ridge of a hill; it’s a long kilometer from the car park to the beginning of the tarns and even longer when your kids are whining.  But, once you get up to the tarns, the views are wonderful!

 

 

Enjoy!

 

 

46 S EnZed signing off…

 

 

 

Posted in Fiordland, New Zealand Also tagged , , , , , , , , |

Catlins IV

Here’s another post about The Catlins!  It’s nice to have this pleasant area so relatively close to us, starting less than an hour to the east of Invercargill.  There are hikes in the forests, hikes to waterfalls and a lot of coastline to explore, along with the wonderful small towns and cafes.

 

 

Our goals for this trip were to go to Matai Falls and hopefully to Cathedral Caves.  Well, Cathedral Caves was still closed because of lambing season and the higher winter/spring tides, but we did get to enjoy Matai Falls.  Matai Falls is about a twenty-minute walk from the car park, and it’s worth the bit of effort.  It’s character is that it’s smaller than some of the other waterfalls and more intimate.  It’s sorta tucked into it’s little valley rather tightly and pleasantly.

 

 

After Matai Falls, we drove over to Nugget Point so that Asta could enjoy her first taste of it.  The weather wasn’t as nice as the first time that we were there, but Asta got the idea.  We also managed to see some New Zealand Fur Seals, and that’s always a treat.  And, again, we enjoyed the small communities along the way!!!

 

 

Enjoy,

 

 

46 S. EnZed signing off…

 

 

Posted in Catlins, New Zealand Also tagged , , , , , , , , |